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, thank you. >> gregg: contest in the background on egypt's president morsi. he was elected in june of this year after a revolution overthrowing president hosni mubarak. he is head 6 muslim brotherhood. he is the first freely elected president and first islamist to be head of an arab state. they accuse him of trying to monopolize powers, the courts and media and parliament and in the end, sharia law, imposing strict islamic principles. >> heather: it raises new questions coming one day after egypt help broker a cease-fire in the gaza strip. former u.s. ambassador to the u.n. john bolton joined us earlier to weigh in saying it's no coincidence. >> he didn't wait but one day before moving here. so whether he had a wink and a nod from president obama or whether whether he felt emboldened in the wake of the cease-fire to believe the u.s. would not criticize him or do anything major to stop this power grab, i think we'll have to find out in the next few days. the timing is not coincidental. you can bet on that. >> heather: coming up the latest reaction from the white house to the turmoil
that is now unfolding in egypt, where just hours ago, the country's highest judicial body calling for a national strike. the protest of a prove by the president there, mohammed morsi granting himself sweeping new powers, a move that since resulted in the violent and widespread protests they've seen. and steve harrigan is streaming live from cairo with the latest. where do the protests go from here? >> rick, the numbers are down today from what we saw on friday and we're likely to see more large scale protest demonstrations in the coming days, after sunday morning prayers and again on tuesday. what we're likely to see then are really competing margins, those who support the president, who feel like his moves are necessary, to break the log jam and to move the country forward and those who think that the president is trying to achieve a dictatorship. those who are trying to block him. so we're going to see more large scale protests and the other things to watch resignation is, three presidential aides have recently resigned in the past two hours and the judges are refusing, so if it
in terms of egypt, a place to live and, the authoritarian regina was especially effective for some time. this issue of outside support -- outside instability was a mechanism to sustain its role. there were many parts of society that are still susceptible to that kind of appeal, particularly in conditions of growing insecurity. i you addressed this as a matter of public education -- how you address this is a matter of public education. to diffuse the different view of these issues for public schools, and if there is the political will to do that, that is a different question. i thought you're getting to the different issue of human rights education in the security apparatus themselves, giving them a different perspective on their role. we have a double challenge here, and that raises the issue that we talked about, in terms of political will. you may want to elaborate on this point in terms of egypt. >> i would just add and say, the way you characterized the securitization of a lot of aspects of egyptian social like -- i will thank you for mentioning that. it is part institutional. it wa
for example in egypt the brotherhood may be very reluctant on certain aspects of the security sector they're dealing with the military privileges of the military but other areas, for example, police, basic police reform and abuses and behavior of police i think my question and the brotherhood would be happy to see this corrected and improved, but that there is a perception within the brotherhood by many in the egyptian government institutions that if you were to address these issues it would result in its short term increase in crime and stability and they feel as though they can either fight crime effectively where they could address these kind of concerns which would be useful in the long term but detrimental in the short term and they would pay a heavy political price for the increase in crime on the basic security that would come with this reform. if you talk a little bit about that and also in tunisia i was there a couple of weeks ago, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need
to create a moral equivalency. i think a ground war is obviously going to test where is egypt, where is turkey. we know where iran is. they are arming the hamas, missiles or a lot of them seem to come out of iran. in essence, it seems to me that something pro joked by iran and encouraged by egypt and turkey by immediately taking the side of hamas which is extraordinary. >> greta: so, with hamas in order to get them to step down from its firing rockets into israel and doing provocative, take at hamas. why in the world they are going reach with truce. they are consumed with hatred toward israel. they were very tight and close to iran. today they identified six people who they felt were conspiring with the israelis. they executed them and dragged one body through the streets. they used civilians as shields. where in the world is if i do strike a temporary deal, why in the world would you ever think it would stick or hold? >> you would have to be totally unrealistic. the secretary-general's comments everybody should show restraint is absurd. if somebody lobbed 130 bombs on new york we wo
and it's the ultimate nn trying to declare the judiciary in egypt basically null and void. >> yeah, look, morsi came out last week looking rather good, like a statesman and he helped organization the cease-fire and reined hamas in and took responsibility and moved immediately from that to give himself dictatorial powers. if those dictatorial powers are taken by him the arab spring is pretty much over and democratization is pretty much over. i'men couraged to see how many people come into the streets and they don't want to trade mubarak to the theocracy that morsi and the brotherhood are proposing. i'm not sure at that morsi is going to give up that easily. >> alisyn: thank you for your insight. good to see you. up next it's a state in debt. why is illinois spending for cable for prisoners and on pig races. and a man gets through security with a woman's boarding pass? how was that done and is anything being done about it. ♪ ♪ ♪ hurry in this saturday and sunday for great deals. likehe lucid by lg, free. or the galaxy nexus by samsung, free. this weekend, get the best deals on the be
next, a lot of people in egypt are not happy with their country's president. [ male announcer ] red lobster's crabfest ends soon. hurry in and try five succulent entrees, like ourender snow crab paired with savory garlic shrimp. just $12.99. come into red lobster and sea food differently. and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99. at legalzoom, we've created a better place to handle your legal needs. maybe you have questions about incorporating a business you'd like to start. or questions about protecting your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like to find the right attorney to help guide you along, answer any questions and offer advice. with an "a" rating from the better business bureau legalzoom helps you get personalized and affordable legal protection. in most states, a legal plan attorney is available with every personalized document to answer any questions. get started at legalzoom.com today. and now you're protected. woman: what do you mean, homeowners insurance doesn't cover floods? [ heart rate increases ] man: a few inches of water caused all this? [ heart
we should be thankful for when it comes to the political world. and egypt's muslim brotherhood. the cease-fire deal betweend evf israel and hamas. we have that coming up next. with wholesome noodles and bite sized chicken, nothing brings you together like chicken noodle soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >> more breaking news and developing stories on a brand-new hour on "happening now." >> a new holiday spending bonanza. americans are feeling more confident about our economy. will lead to the great of growth, and what could set us back? >> also, an arrest in a string of murders in new york city connected to one gunman. what we are learning about the man that police in new york city say was poised to strike again. and a large bird crashes through the cockpit plane of this airport. details of the scare in the air for the pilot and passengers. it's all "happening now." >> but first, the cease-fire truce may be fragile, but it appeals to be holding. i am heather childers in for jenna lee. >> and i am rick scott in for jon scott. with egypt's president mohammed mo
there are major developments to tell you about in egypt. new protests breaking out after egyptian president mohammed morsi announced far-reaching powers placing himself above any government law. that has sparked the violent clashes that he see here on the streets and dozens of protests but the country's justice minister now saying there is some sort of resolution on all of this imminent. steve harrigan joins us now streaming live from cairo with the latest. steve, do you think that we could see some kind of compromise today on this? >> reporter: martha, we are certainly hearing sound from the presidential teamsh to reace opposition in a push for a possible compromise. what we're likely to see in the next 90 minutes here is a meeting between egypt's president and some top judges here inside cairo. judges across the country have gone on strike. they say the president tried to put himself above the law. we could see some scaling back from a presidential team that has been surprised by the angry reaction to the move by president morsi, martha. martha: such a key moment for the future of egypt.
saw this massive push in this really indigenous push within egypt, tunisia, and other democratic governments. some of those movements have had potentially scary things. there are some islamic fundamentalist parties that we do not have great relationships with and they understand that can be confusing thing. what obama has tried to do and in his famous speech in cairo is that he wants to deal with these countries and talk to the electorate. now we have an entirely different landscape, but in egypt, libya, and tunisia. relationship with these countries, these are countries with democratic governments. some of them have chosen paths that are a little more moderate, some leaning a little bit more to the fundamentalist side, but they're still fundamentally democratic and that will be a big challenge for the obama administration. host: its next for egypt? -- what is next for egypt? ?uest: in terms of ta host: the obama administration. guest: they still need to establish some of the legitimate government there. after the incredibly uplifting movements in it to rear square, it has devolv
president of egypt seems to be supportive of the palestinians. >> not seems to be, it is. he's withdrawn the ambassador. he wants to push the issue into play at the u.n., he's summoned the arab league. morisi does not he ban to attach himself to hamas let alone to the jihaddist groups, smaller ones that are operating in gaza. he has a loan that they are negotiating, a billion-plus in military assistance from the united states. he's got multiple audiences on this. he's going to appear supportive. the question is can he bring his influence? remember, the muslim brotherhood is in fact the foundation stone from which hamas emerged. he does have influence with hamas. they share a common border. hamas has to give some credibility to what he wants and to what he said. the question is, how much time do we have before this escalates to a ground incursion? jon: the palestinians profess they want their own state. hard to argue that you deserve statehood when you're launching rockets at your neighbor. >> you have three states between the mediterranean and the jordan river. have you a weak and dysfun
and israel exchanged rocket and shell fire. in november 13, is real and hamas said messages via egypt indicating interest in a truce, but then it degraded from there. at the question is whether egypt can play a role, or the united states which has sent hillary clinton, can play a role. the israelis debate a ground invasion of your reporting from gaza city, the olive orchards, they lied to enter the border. monday the area was a virtual no mans land. hundreds of families have fled. it says that gazana are not the only ones encouraged about a ground invasion. talks in cairo, continue in cairo. let us hear from on next call, terry in maryland, on our line for republicans. caller: america has no real influence in the middle east. i say that because we have been trying to negotiate this cents ronald reagan. and if we had any influence with the arab-speaking population, we basically would have succeeded by now. the reality is, for half of the countries, we are nothing more than ana tm, and the other half, -- we are nothing more nothingan atm and for the others we are nothing more than an an
as the cia director. >>> in egypt today one man is dead after violent clashes with police. protesters are camping out in cairo's tahrir square. in a scene strikingly similar to what we saw in the revolution almost two years ago, the demonstrators are voicing their anger with president mohamed morsi after what some are calling an unprecedented power grab. cnn's reza sayah is joining us from cairo once again. reza, we're hearing about attacks against several muslim brotherhood offices in egypt. what do you know about that? >> reporter: according to the brotherhood spokesperson, two of their offices were attacked by anti-morsi protesters. the brotherhood says the protesters were carrying molotov cocktails, clubs and knives and destroyed and heavily damaged these offices. remember, muslim brotherhood had called for a one-million-man demonstration of their own today to rival the opposition's demonstrations. late last night they called it off to avoid violence. but in these two particular cities north of cairo, they didn't avoid violence. >> reza, we're also seeing and i want to show our vi
. >> this is the ate latest in a series of moves he engaged in. in august he sidelined egypt's military council and took their powers for himself, the legislative and constitutional assembly powers they had and the only check remaining on his power after that time was the judiciary and now he swept aside that check. he has consolidated all power for thims and asked the people to trust him and guide egypt through this transitional period. >> protesters want him to step down. what do you see happening here? >> looks like neither side is prepared to back down. you're right. they're not prepared to trust him. morsi is not some sort of reveered national figure that played a role in the revolution. he seems a very partisan guy that really has islamist interests at heart so the liberals see no other choice but to go out in the street and protest until morsi backs down and looks like now both sides are angling for a compromise. >> what can the west do? >> i think it is no mistake this is taking place after the gaza conflict. the movie mentioned last year took place after a big terrorist attack in the s
've pulled your ambassador out of cairo. is that peace treaty stween israel and egypt on the verge of collapse? >> it's vital not just for israel, egypt, it's vital for the entire region, for the world. we understand this. we think the egyptians understand this full well. the egyptians have played a constructive role in the past mediating -- i think they can play the similar role today. >> are they? >> i think they can. >> but are that? >> that's all i can say right now is i think they can play a constructive role. and we hope they will. >> that suggests to me they're not yet doing that. >> well, right now the situation's very fluid on the ground. and hamas shows every intention of escalating further. it's not stepping down. >> mr. ambassador, thanks very much for coming in. we're watching this situation very, very closely. >> thank you, wolf. >> michael oren is the israeli ambassador to the united states. in our next hour we're going to take a look at what the u.s. -- if the u.s. can do anything about this escalating violence that's going on, the tensions escalating between the is
billion going to egypt and the muslim brotherhood. i do not think that money ought to be sent because they proved they will be working with us against terrorism, by their trading with our good friend in the middle east, israel, and we need to be unified with israel, shoulder to shoulder with israel, preventing iran from getting nuclear weapon capability. one of the big missed opportunities of this president being quiet when they had the spring uprising and the resolution -- the revolution in iran. i remember ronald reagan said -- he called the soviet union the evil empire. we should have at least said those in iran who wanted a free and just society. the president kept quiet. i do agree with tim kaine on the issue of virginia tech. everyone should be commended by that response and all campuses are more say. i would like to ask you do you think we ought to be sending -- spending $450 billion? >> in my response, george talked more about sequestered. i want to do the same. we put two very clear visions on the table. we agree we have to stop defense cuts. we have two plans. i say we can a
proactive and extending aid to egypt before and after morsi was elected, and i think it's important to understand what sort of things egypt needed right away was an ability to sell government bonds and treasury bills were because it takes about 14% interest which is pretty high for a government come and immediate deaths things look terrible. they came in and said okay. we will buy your one month issue of bills. a good payment unless the government defaults on everything. but that has helped relieve some of the interest pressure and try to move egypt out of the debt trap than greece or italy or spain. the second thing they have done is like the development bank there's quite good development banks that help identify the investment projects, make sure they are built without corruption and that they become effective. i think it is $4.5 billion that were qatar and saudi arabia have and christine was out there in september and they were working on a long program, very low interest rate and there would be another four and a half million or so but then egypt has a fighting chance to get an
network, violent extremists trying to link up with al qaeda. as police in egypt bust a terror cell and seize enough weapons to carry out a mumbai-style attack. catherine herridge is collecting all the late-breaking information. she will be here live next hour. right now brand new stories and breaking news. jenna: president obama and house speaker john boehner pledging to work together this time around with the threat of the fiscal cliff just months away. is it just talk or are they actually going to find common ground before it is too late? we'll talk about that. >>> plus the deadly disease that can be predicted by visible signs of aging. we'll talk about that with a doctor coming up. >>> armed motor thieves racing through a busy mall. how about that? the jewelry store heist caught on tape. it's all "happening now.". jenna: hi, everybody. great to have you with us today. i'm jenna lee. jon: i'm jon scott. lots to get too today. we want to get started what is going on in the northeast. mother nature package powerful punch hitting an area still recovering from superstorm sandy d a st
of the arab spring. what happened in egypt was that the traditional model of power, the pyramids, but inverted. the people at the top got up and it and the base had its say. the arab spring is ongoing. it is messy. it is dangerous. what i'm talking about is bigger than egypt or anyplace else. it is a massive shift. it is one of those moments in 100 years the real historians like those at georgetown will write about this phenomenon. the base of the pyramid is taking more control. institutions that have always governed our lives, and music, are being bypassed answers the tested. people are holding them to account, demanding that they be more open, more responsive, more effective, or else. here in the u.s. to have the tea party hammering big governments. you had occupy due to the jolly bankers of wall street. social movements are competing. we have to help the more of my mental and the day. we are 3.2 million people at last count. we are asking the world to pay attention to the least among us. there are many things we can do to help them. we will see things are happening in the developing world.
the word egypt and they got a totally different responses. why? because there is a process going on every time that we search for something on our laptop we are not only gathering information, we are giving information about what we buy about what we find interesting, about what we like it, perhaps with our political biases may be said that in theory a search engine would be giving me objective information and you and i ought to get the same information if we tied in the same word, not so anymore. that's kind of scary. >> because somebody is making up in their mind as to what it is that we want. >> it is a series. it is the computer. what is the word i'm looking for all or a -- algorithm. thank you. >> algorithm is fine, and by understand that it exists, and i respect and i will salute it. it's there. but i want to know what all of that has to do with journalism. who gets up in the morning and covers something? who is going to go out and cover the war? who is going to cover the campaign? without the journalist being there doing the abc information gathering, honest information gathering,
: we will leave it there. a couple of stories regarding the situation in egypt. the lead story in "the washington post" -- also regarding the same story in "the financial times" -- back to the phones with our discussion for remedies to speed up the voting process. cathy, you are on "the washington journal." del ahead. caller: we have a vote by mail here. it is wonderful. we do not have problems. i am a little bit surprised a many people in the eastern part of the united states think there is so much fraud. we really do not have that much of a problem here. we always have a paper ballot to recount. host: our next call comes from jane in philadelphia on the line for republicans. caller: the story a minority inspector at the polls. -- i am a minority inspector at the polls. i think the only way to fix the problem is with an id. i had a van pulled up and ask them to see if they were in the book. they were not. they handed me a voter registration card. it looked strange to me. it was stamped from the city of philadelphia. the address said south spruce street. i know it runs east to west. it
palestinians, thousands of israeli forces are awaiting possible orders to invade the region. >>> egypt's leaders are in the middle of this dispute, a cease-fire between the two sides is possible. mohamed morsi met with leaders of turkey, qatar, and the leaders of hamas there are no guarantees, but working to try to ensure a cease-fire. benjamin netanyahu says he's willing to discuss a cease-fire when hamas agrees to stop rocket fire from gaza. >>> thousands expected to march in washington, in opposition to the controversial keystone pipeline. the event organized by the westside 350.org and promises to support the president if he says no to the pipeline protesters will circle the white house. it's part of the organization's month-long tour across the country. earlier this year, president obama blocked the pipeline because of environmental concerns. many republicans say that the pipeline would have created thousands of jobs. >>> notice lights out on capitol hill last night, no reason to be afraid of the dark. police say the lights that illuminate the dome of the u.s. capitol were turned
about our embassy in cairo egypt. local tv host had played this clip incessantly and raging muslims -- enraging muslims throughout egypt who stormed our embassy and tore down the american flag and put up an islamist flag. a few hours later the -- they said it was over the video even though the next day the president referred to it as an act of terror. four americans were killed including our ambassador. ever since then, our republican friends have been using this terror attack, i'm sorry did i say using? i meant exploiting this terror attack to smear the president in any way they can. as you know, in 9-11-01 a terror attack is a reason to unite and cheer a president and in 9-11-12, it is an excuse to smear a president. there have been rumors of course that the president might be nominating susan rice, our u.n. ambassador to be his next secretary of state. and the most unlikely love couple of all in d.c., john mccain and lindsey graham got together to -- well, to say a lot of ignorant stuff. let's begin with j
between egypt and yemen. i think we know that saudi arabia had mixed feelings about how quickly mubarak was dumped, and -- but they also, the saudis playeded a crucial role of easing yemen. it was not easy. it was slow. it was bloody, but compared to the other changes, it was not that bad. in april of to 20* -- 2011, just as the arab spring was in full bloom, if you will, the c7 finance ministers met in france and formed a partnership with the vision that was simple that europe had been through this kind of thing before. after eastern europe broke away
of letting the democracy happen what happened in egypt, libya, democratic elections. they're going to have to deal with their own almost civil war like we had to make sure that they get the government they want and not necessarily our outcome can't just be we can establish a government that's friendly to us. it has to be the people and sometimes it takes generations for these governments to really take hold and be by the people. host: thanks for the call. guest: that's a fair point. i wouldn't say that the problem in afghanistan is the united states is opposed to democracy per say. what i would say is that the united states and the rest of the international community and after gans themselves have a long way to go before they have something that looks like a credible and effective democracy takes root. and before we get there there is the prospect that the country could revert back to if not civil war but extensive conflict throughout the country, extreme violence and that is of concern to the united states. and the reason it's of concern is not simply a humanitarian one or to put who we w
to me sierra -- tunisia, to yemen, to egypt. host: this is from maverick, who says republicans would prefer john kerry, freeing up space for scott brown. susan rice has degrees from stanford and oxford. patty, republican caller. caller: i wonder if this gentleman is aware that cnn had no problem going into this embassy to find documents. it was deliberate that did not send in the fbi to investigate. this was right before an election, and this gentleman is not sure why it took so long? also, c-span should have done some in depth shows before the election. i am disappointed in how you protected president obama in comparison to the-shows when president bush was president. part of the problem in ameritech is -- in america is the media should put under their caption white house stenographer. there was also a laser with where the attacks were, and that is why he got killed. he was an absolute hero. guest: there is concern with talking points in the mainstream media, as it is called, but in my defense i have written very critical things about barack obama and his presidency over the last th
your mother would be gone for years. she came to the u.s. in egypt even know it. >> guest: she's still like that in a way, you know, where she does things that we don't fit into the equation sometimes. and it's been a struggle to get her to be a little more motherly. i think at this point we've come to expect that's the way she is and we just take her as she is. i think it helps because we're not disappointed. i do hope we could be a better grandmother. i know my great-grandmother, my mother said she wasn't such a great mother. but to ask him if she was the most wonderful grandmother in the world. so i'm hoping that's the way my children feel for her as well. that's all i want for my kids have a good relationship. >> host: reyna grandecan assume other mother to read this book, or does she know within a? >> guest: she hasn't read the book is it's in english and my mother does not speak english. she knows some of us in it because i told her this is the story about my childhood and growing up in the u.s. and i write about you, my dad, but i don't think my mother really understand about ho
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

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